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The latest environmental news, from the most reliable sources, all in one place.


Mon, 14 Aug 2017 08:15:47 GMT  


NBCNews.com: Environment Sat, 08 Apr 2017 22:06:39 GMT  

Togo seizes tusks of 500 dead elephants

Authorities in Togo have seized nearly 4 tons  of ivory —  the tusks from over 500 dead elephants — hidden in containers destined for Vietnam, officials said on Monday.Authorities in Togo have seized nearly 4 tons  of ivory —  the tusks from over 500 dead elephants — hidden in containers destined for Vietnam, officials said on Monday.


Report: Keystone pipeline would have minimal environmental impact
A new State Department report on the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline finds that the project would have minimal impact on the environment, an assessment likely to increase pressure on the White House to approve it. But the report sets no deadline for doing so.
Snowy owl recovering after being hit by bus in DC

A snowy owl that ventured south to the unlikely habitat of Washington, D.C., was clearly not cut out for city life. The animal was hit by a bus and was recovering with wildlife experts Friday.A snowy owl that ventured south to the unlikely habitat of Washington, D.C., was clearly not cut out for city life. The animal was hit by a bus and was recovering with wildlife experts Friday.



http://wwwc.environmentalhealthnews.org/archives_rss.jsp Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:40:52 GMT  


http://embed.earthwire.org/feeds/getnews_uk_rss.xml Tue, 07 Mar 2017 11:07:33 GMT  


Environmental News Network Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:40:52 GMT  

Hot spot at Hawaii? Not so fast
Through analysis of volcanic tracks, Rice University geophysicists have concluded that hot spots like those that formed the Hawaiian Islands aren’t moving as fast as recently thought.Hot spots are areas where magma pushes up from deep Earth to form volcanoes. New results from geophysicist Richard Gordon and his team confirm that groups of hot spots around the globe can be used to determine how fast tectonic plates move.Gordon, lead author Chengzu Wang and co-author Tuo Zhang developed a method to analyze the relative motion of 56 hot spots grouped by tectonic plates. They concluded that the hot-spot groups move slowly enough to be used as a global reference frame for how plates move relative to the deep mantle. This confirmed the method is useful for viewing not only current plate motion but also plate motion in the geologic past.
Destruction of small wetlands directly linked to algal blooms in Great Lakes
Canada’s current wetland protection efforts have overlooked how the environment naturally protects fresh-water resources from agricultural fertilizer contaminants, researchers from the University of Waterloo have found.In a recent study, researchers at Waterloo’s Faculty of Science and Faculty of Engineering found that small wetlands have a more significant role to play than larger ones in preventing excess nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus from fertilizer from reaching waterbodies such as the Great Lakes.
Genome analysis with near-complete privacy possible
It is now possible to scour complete human genomes for the presence of disease-associated genes without revealing any genetic information not directly associated with the inquiry, say Stanford University researchers.This “genome cloaking” technique, devised by biologists, computer scientists and cryptographers at the university, ameliorates many concerns about genomic privacy and potential discrimination based on an individual’s genome sequence.

http://www.envirolink.org/environews.rss Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:40:52 GMT  


http://www.eurekalert.org/rss/earth_science.xml Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:40:52 GMT  


Isla Earth Radio Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:40:53 GMT  

Coast Report
If we gave our coastlines an environmental report card, what grade should they get? Surprise! There IS a report, and it gives our coasts about a grade "C." It's called the National Coastal Condition Report, and it's the third in a series started by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2001. It's the first truly national assessment of all our coastlines' ecological health, including the Great Lakes, Alaska and Hawaii. Surprisingly, some areas scored better than before. The Northeast and the West have improved since the last report; while the Southeast and the Gulf of Mexico rank lower. Overall, our coastlines earned a down-the-middle "Fair," when it comes to water quality, sediment quality, habitat, contaminants in fish tissue and conditions for bottom-dwelling critters. But while "Fair" might sound as stinging as a bad grade in math class, it actually holds promise. Comparisons with the 2005 report card show slight improvements due, possibly, to positive effects from environmental laws passed in the 1970s. If you think our coasts could do better, you're right and you can help by cleaning litter off a beach and eating sustainably farmed seafood. Small changes, maybe. But they make the grade: Coast to coast. Script by Gail Davis
Health Factors Threaten Gorillas - But Why?
What's a significant threat to the survival of captive gorillas? Surprisingly it's heart disease. It's ironic. In the wild, gorillas inch closer to extinction daily from habitat loss and poaching. Because of this troubling outlook for wild gorillas, zookeepers especially want to maintain captive gorillas in good health. Yet male gorillas in zoos and preserves have significant rates of chronic heart disease. So high that veterinarian Pam Dennis of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo describes heart disease as "a major threat to gorilla health." Are genetics a factor? Or diet, or exercise, or a virus? To find answers, researchers have formed the Gorilla Health Project, a collaboration of zoos across North America. They are pooling information to form a database about gorilla heart disease and other conditions affecting captive gorillas. At the Cleveland zoo, recent heart exams of two males in their twenties revealed signs of minor heart disease in one and advanced heart disease in the other. Just like humans, they're now taking beta blockers and/or ACE inhibitors, to hopefully stem their disease progression. And now thanks to the database, how they fare may help other gorillas. Script by Bob Rhein
Coal Gasification
It's no news flash that, over the years, one of the dirtiest sources of energy has been coal; in fact, it's among the top contributors to carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The challenge, according to the U.S. government's Energy Information Administration, is that coal accounts for about fifty percent of all the energy produced in the U.S. Luckily, new technologies already in use are making coal a cleaner-burning fuel. Coal gasification is based on a technology that's been around since the 1850s. Rather than burning coal directly, it's exposed to steam and oxygen under high temperatures and pressures. The chemical reaction produces gases. So, how "green" is it? Well, the byproduct from coal gasification, hydrogen, is considered one of the cleanest burning fuels on earth. Yet, there is still the environmental impact of mining coal and transporting it. And, the process itself has a few glitches, like it still has carbon as part of the mix. While scientists continue looking for ways to capture and get rid of carbon for good, like burying it underground, reducing your own energy needs will help. After all, one bright idea deserves another! Script by Bob Rhein

http://www.ipsnews.net/rss/environment.xml Sat, 07 Jan 2017 07:01:08 GMT  


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hybrid cars
About Environmental Issues Mon, 27 Mar 2017 10:24:46 GMT  

Vulnerabilities to Global Warming

potatoes

The IPCC working group responsible for evaluating society's vulnerability to climate change has released its section of the Fifth Assessment Report. The first article in this series examines the working group's findings about food security. The second one reviews what the IPCC identified as urban vulnerabilities to climate change. Finally, a look at the 9 cities most at risk from flooding associated with climate change (and the most resilient, too). (Photo: DTL/morgueFile)

Vulnerabilities to Global Warming originally appeared on About.com Environmental Issues on Wednesday, May 21st, 2014 at 14:40:41.

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Landscapes, Slow Turtles, and Roads

Boreal forest road

I suggested earlier than one of the top environmental issues is the way in which we use land. One resulting pattern is widespread landscape fragmentation. I explain what fragmentation is in a new article here. Another very visible element of modern landscapes is our sprawling road network. In two new articles you can read about road ecology, and about roadkill. (Photo: A road cuts through boreal forest. Credit: dyet/morgueFile.com)

Landscapes, Slow Turtles, and Roads originally appeared on About.com Environmental Issues on Friday, May 16th, 2014 at 11:35:33.

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Science: Participate!

Blackthroated_Blue_Warbler_USFWS.jpg

Nowadays, opportunities for amateurs to contribute to science abound. Learn more about citizen science.

(Photo: Black-throated Blue Warbler. USFWS)

Science: Participate! originally appeared on About.com Environmental Issues on Thursday, May 15th, 2014 at 14:14:50.

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ENS Headlines Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:40:55 GMT  

China Braces for Record Third Typhoon in a Week
Curiosity Lands on Mars Seeking Signs of Life
Chevron Faces Midnight Deadline in $19 Billion Ecuador Judgment
Bird Flu Jumps to Seals, Humans Could Be Next

http://wwwc.environmentalhealthnews.org/archives_rss.jsp?sm=fr13%3Bcurrentissues83%3B0http%3A%2F%2Fwww.environmentalhealthnews.org%2Fnamespaces%2F2003%2F11%2F01%2Fschema%23Climate_change14%3BClimate+change Mon, 21 Aug 2017 14:40:55 GMT  


Mon, 14 Aug 2017 08:15:49 GMT  


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